Critical Education https://ices.library.ubc.ca/index.php/criticaled <p><em>Critical Education</em> is an international peer-reviewed journal, which seeks manuscripts that critically examine contemporary education contexts and practices. <em>Critical Education</em> is interested in theoretical and empirical research as well as articles that advance educational practices that challenge the existing state of affairs in society, schools, and informal education.</p> en-US <p>Authors who publish with <em>Critical Education</em> agree to the following terms:<br><br></p> <ol type="a"> <ol type="a"> <li class="show">Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/" target="_new">Creative Commons Attribution License</a> that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.</li> </ol> </ol> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ol type="a"> <ol type="a"> <li class="show">Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.</li> </ol> </ol> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ol type="a"> <li class="show">Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work (See <a href="http://opcit.eprints.org/oacitation-biblio.html">The Effect of Open Access</a>).</li> </ol> wayne.ross@ubc.ca (E. Wayne Ross) wayne.ross@ubc.ca (E. Wayne Ross) Fri, 15 May 2020 14:18:07 -0700 OJS 3.1.1.4 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Why Do University Students in the UK Buy Assignments from Essay Mills? https://ices.library.ubc.ca/index.php/criticaled/article/view/186534 <p>This article considers the growing crisis on a specific form of plagiarism in the UK where students purchase assignments from so called essay mills which they then submit as their own work. It departs from the dominant discourses, however, to highlight the sociological context within which such student plagiarism, termed contract cheating, is occurring. This context revolves around an increasing shortage of graduate jobs and the stress and anxiety caused by the competition for the jobs that are available. It argues that the dominant discourses that simply describe and denounce contract cheating are not only devoid of such a contextual understanding, they work against such an analysis. It concludes that the way to prevent or eradicate such student plagiarism lies not in the criminalisation and punishment of offending businesses or individual miscreates but, rather, in a sociological understanding of why it occurs in the first place, which signals the need for radical reform of the existing social order as it relates to employment and education.</p> Michael Naughton ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0 https://ices.library.ubc.ca/index.php/criticaled/article/view/186534 Tue, 07 Apr 2020 16:10:24 -0700